Sea Eagle Boating — Bringing Loved Ones Together

Here are Ken and Teri Johns in their Sea Eagle 370 in Monterey Bay, California. “Oh, how we love our Sea Eagles,” says Teri. “We own two Sea Eagle Adventure Kayaks; a 330 and a 370. We use our 370 the most; our 330 gets to come out to play when we take friends kayaking — friends who don't own a Sea Eagle......yet!”
Here are Ken and Teri Johns in their Sea Eagle 370 in Monterey Bay, California. “Oh, how we love our Sea Eagles,” says Teri. “We own two Sea Eagle Adventure Kayaks; a 330 and a 370. We use our 370 the most; our 330 gets to come out to play when we take friends kayaking — friends who don’t own a Sea Eagle……yet!”

“We always tell people that kayaking is great for our marriage,” says Teri Johns, of Hilmar, California. “To kayak together, you have to work as team, and when in the boat, it’s you, your spouse, and quality time surrounded by the beauty of the environment you have chosen to enjoy on that particular day.”

Teri tells us, “My husband and I take pride in going kayaking together. Our Sea Eagles have provided us a reason to go to so many beautiful places and share all of it together. We can plan a trip or just go at a moment’s notice. We consider our kayaking adventures a perfect date.”

Sea Eagle kayaking aka “beautiful marriage counseling” must be working because, at this writing, Teri and her husband, Ken, are celebrating their 26th anniversary. Today they own two Sea Eagle Sport Kayaks, their original 330 and a larger 370. Why’d they get a second Sea Eagle? “We liked that fact that the 370 is a bit larger than the 330, and LOVED that we would then have a second boat to offer company. Each kayak is stored in its own rolling suitcase.  One or both fit in the trunk of the car or gets easily tossed into the back of the pickup truck.”

Still boating, still loving it. 

Teri tells her story. “We love our Sea Eagles. Kayaking first entered our lives as we were fast approaching having an empty nest. We decided that kayaking would be an exciting addition to our marriage —  20 years at the time.” The Johns play together and work together, too. “Kenny is a plumbing contractor and works with my Dad,” says Teri. “I do the billing for the business, but often joke that I am a retired stay-at-home Mom, and enjoying it.”

This “flock” of Sea Eagles belongs to the Johns and their kayaking friends. The Johns have four sets of friends who own Sea Eagles. The day this photo was taken, their friends, the Bouchers, “test drove” the Johns’ Sea Eagle. Soon after, the Bouchers became proud Sea Eagle owners, too.
This “flock” of Sea Eagles belongs to the Johns and their kayaking friends. The Johns have four sets of friends who own Sea Eagles. The day this photo was taken, their friends, the Bouchers, “test drove” the Johns’ Sea Eagle. Soon after, the Bouchers became proud Sea Eagle owners, too.

Ken and Teri describe themselves as ‘recreational’ kayakers. “We try to avoid rough and turbulent waters…usually. We have found our 370, and our 330 for that matter, to be very stable and responsive through the rapids that we have encountered over the years. Our 370 gracefully maneuvers the gentle flows of our local California lakes and meets head-on the challenge of a rapid or two in the rivers we have had the pleasure of ‘putting in.’”

And they do get around. Some of the Johns’ favorite lakes are Pinecrest, Bass, McSwain, and Don Pedro Lakes. Top reservoirs? Modesto and Melones. Best rivers? Merced, Stanislaus, and Tuolumne.

10-foot waves — 5-star rating

Though they prefer flatwater, Teri tells of a recent ocean adventure. “We gave our Sea Eagle a 5-Star Rating when we found ourselves in heavy seas along the California coast in Santa Cruz.  The waves swelled to 10 feet high and we were barely clearing the crest of each wave before it would curl.”

There was no water beneath us

“It was quite the sensation when we would be at the top of a wave; we would continue the motion to paddle, but there would be no water beside us to push the paddle through.  Then, suddenly came the sensation of dropping down the backside of the swell, similar to the feeling of being in an elevator, only to stare down the next wall of water rising higher and higher in front of us.”

“‘Trust the boat, trust the boat’ was our mantra as we counted the waves, waiting for just the right time to head for the harbor. The 370 is a champ! Her stability – unWAVEring!”

Enthusiastically, Teri and Ken Johns

Do YOU have a Sea Eagle story and photos to share? Email us today!

One thought on “Sea Eagle Boating — Bringing Loved Ones Together

  1. Like you, my wife and I find the quiet time paddling in our 370 one of the best simple pleasures of life.

    We have been boating for over 35 years working our way all the way up to a 40′ double cabin Mainship, but we have just as much, fun paddling our 370 together on Lake Royale in NC. My favorite time to go is in the fall and the winter when the water is flat and the air is just a bit brisk, but I am looking forward to the summer as well.

    Also, you you and many others, we have both a 330 and a 370. When I go out alone, I take the 330, but this summer we will use the 330 for our friends to come with us. I have one standard seat in the back of th3 330 and one deluxe seat in the front. This is a good way to put 2 adults in a 330 as the standard seat can squeeze all the way against the stern of the 330 and the deluxe seat gives great back support for the front paddler. The standard rear seat provides reasonable back support when used in the rear like this as it is supported by the rear spray skirt to give additional support.

    It seems like lots of Sea Eagle fans like to own both a 330 and a 370. At the affordable price level of each, why not!!! paddling is always fun with more friends..

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